One Drawing 2 ways // Sketchbook Sunday

Hi friends! Today for sketchbook Sunday I decided to draw the same subject twice. Once in marker and once in watercolor. Watch the video and let me know what one you like better!

Supplies (Affiliate links used)

That’s it for me tonight! I am late getting this blog post up because I got to spend the afternoon teaching an amazing group of ladies how to paint lilacs in watercolor! What a fun time! I hope you had a great day too and til next time happy crafting!

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Did Somebody Say Food Puns?

Hi friends! I love corny jokes and puns so when I came across some Darcies stamps at the stamp show this year I had to grab a couple sets!

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Then I remembered I had one set at home I got a couple years before that hadn’t even seen ink yet! (It was pre-Konmari, you will have to excuse me LOL!)

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I like how the pickle and ketchup sets go so well together.

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The puns mix and match well between sets. And they are so fun to color! I used the tri-blend markers but you can use whatever you like!20190606_154556

Watch the video to see how!

Supplies (affiliate links used)

  • Stamps: I used stamps by Darcies If you like the stamps I used they have dozens of different theme drawn in the same style and they are $8 a set. If you like to color and you like cute kawaii style images I highly recommend them! I used Stay cool,  Ketchup Soon set and the Big Dill set
  • Markers: Crafter’s Companion Spectrum Noir TriBlend. Each marker contains a light, medium and dark version of the color. I used a variety of markers in the project. Each marker is $5 which contains bullet tips of 3 shades:  (3 mini markers in one) I used mostly: Dull green, Blue Turquoise, Fair Skin, light yellow, orange, citrus green, lavender, pale pink, bright pink and dark red. *These colors are within the Spectrum Noir coloring system so you might already have them (the colors) in your stash. You can use the refill inks to refill them too simply by pulling out the nib and dripping the ink in.
  • Food paper stack
  • Blending brushes
  • Action wobble springs
  • Memento inks * won’t run with alcohol markers
  • Neenah cardstock (favorite for alcohol markers) http://shrsl.com/

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I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and you try some of these techniques on your next card! Happy crafting!

Drawing my Favorite Fruit!

Hi friends! Today for Sketchbook Sunday I am painting peaches with alcohol markers and colored pencils:

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It was so fun to draw! You can find the real-time narrated full lesson to this art in Critique Club where you will also find over 11 hours of real-time drawing/painting lessons from my sketchbook Sunday series in real time and fully narrated lessons. In addition to all of the lessons and creative prompts, you can upload 2 paintings a month for an in-depth critique from me if you want! The goal of this membership is to keep you practicing, motivated and help you grow as an artist. You get all of this for $5 a month and you can end your subscription anytime. I hope to see you in Critique Club!

Supplies: (affiliate links used)

Before you go a word about markers and supplies in general. I don’t want anyone to think you have to have brush tip markers for this. You don’t. If you have a variety of yellows, orange, pinks, and reds you can do this! Try using the chisel end for the large areas and the bullet tip for the fine areas. the honest truth is that you can create beautiful artwork with either type as long as you spend time learning how to use them. The set of 48 brush tip ohuhu markers I used as part of this illustration and lovely but the brush tip is not going to last as long as the bullet tip on the classic style and they are more expensive per marker and you get a smaller color range. I started off with Bic Mark-its and Prismacolor markers which were bullet and chisel tip markers and I still love those today. It is just what you get used to. If you have a set of markers already I bet they will do you just fine if you play with them and get used to their working abilities. I see a trend of jumping on the newest and greatest supplies without exploring what the stuff we already have can do. I get it, I love to try new supplies but the more I try the more I am convinced that most are equal to what we have already and with markers you really should use up what you have before they dry out. Then try the latest and greatest (or find refills.) I had some cheap Studio 71 markers that were well loved and I was going through them the other day to see what was still inky and what tips were frayed and I found about 10 markers with frayed tips. I almost tossed them but I decided to order some replacement Copic nibs I found on sale and I am going to see if I can repair the markers and I am going to see if I can make my own custom ink. Wish me luck and let me know if you would like to see a video of my experiment (if it works anyway LOL!)

I basically want to say that I don’t want to to feel like you have to have exactly what I am using because the pencils, paper, and markers in your stash are probably pretty darn close, there are only so many ways to make a marker or pencil. Only upgrade when you hit the limit of what you can do with them. And as always happy crafting!

Color with me and learn about markers! Free Image Provided!

Hi friends! Remember how much fun it was to color when you were a kid? Well, it’s still fun as I am sure you know but it can be frustrating too. Today I am going to share tips and techniques for coloring with alcohol markers and you can try along with me using the markers you have.

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I will have a download for my bird of paradise drawing in the supply list below the videos. I broke the lessons into two videos, the first is a primer on alcohol markers and what other supplies you might need to begin coloring. If you are familiar with the supplies you can skip to the coloring tutorial in the second video. I also go over the differences between the different kinds of markers available (brush, bullet, and chisel nib) as well as compatible paper and ink in the first video so if you are considering getting started and you do not have supplies yet it will be very informative.

In part 2 we will finally get to color, yay!

This video is sponsored by Bianyo offering Superior art product at affordable prices  *Check out specials/coupon codes below! *The links below contain the discounts mentioned and the discounted price will show at checkout.

Supplies:

Here is a photo of the Bianyo markers arranged the way I like them. The plastic inserts in the box keep each marker in place. After arranging them I made a new swatch to represent the order.

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You can organize your markers in whatever way that makes sense to you. Also, alcohol markers can have a steeper learning curve than other coloring media so make sure you are fair to yourself and give yourself time to learn and practice. I hope you enjoyed today’s video lesson and you learned some skills to use on your next project! Til next time happy crafting!

Sketching Orange Slices in Marker!

Hi friends! Today I played with markers and it was fun! This was actually supposed to be posted for Sketchbook Sunday but I got busy and didn’t realize I forgot to blog it until 10pm and I was too tired to type.

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I was inspired to sketch these oranges because they looked so cool sitting on the cutting board. I accidentally bought Cara-Cara oranges instead of navel oranges at the store last week and this was the last one. None of us are a fan of this type orange hence it was still on the table after the kids left for school. So before I tossed it out to the birds (the crows like them apparently) I thought I would draw it. It also gave me a chance to try out a new set of markers I will be using for an upcoming tutorial.

Supplies (affiliate links used)

I am excited to work more with these markers. It’s ice to try something different once in a while and see where that takes you. I find when I do this I come back to my other work more energized and refreshed. It’s like cross-training for your crafty muscles LOL! If you have a suggestion as to what flower to draw for the in-depth marker tutorial please let me know in the comments below. thank for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

Don’t be Confused by Color! Try These Tips Instead!

Hi friends! Today I am going to share ways to make coloring with alcohol markers so much easier no matter what brand or mix of brands you have!

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I will be demonstrating my technique with my 120 color Ohuhu alcohol marker set. They are probably the most affordable brand of alcohol markers on the market so you do not need expensive pens for this to work. I reviewed the Ohuhu Markers in the past and was very impressed with them, especially when they swatched over to the new style, you can see a comparison here if you want more information. In today’s video, I am going to share a grouping technique that will work with any brand of alcohol marker tho.  The first 13 minutes of this video shows my swatch guide method. The remainder of the video is a coloring demo.

Supplies & Resources (affiliate links used)

Here’s what to do (as explained in the video)
1. Swatch out all of your markers noting the brand and color number on your swatch.

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2. Sort your markers in groups by their color and undertones. For instance, you would have pinks, pinkish reds, neutral reads, coral/orange reds, warm (orange) yellows, cool (green-leaning) yellows, yellow-greens, teals, blues, purples, cool grays, warm grays, neutrals etc.

*Sort them as specifically as you like. If you are new to coloring with alcohol markers keep groups smaller (less than 6 colors) but no more than 12. *If you have more than 12 break them into two groups that are more specific. Secure each group with a rubber band.

3. Swatch the colors on a strip of cardstock. *Always swatch on the paper you normally use for markers.

4. Punch a circle in the center of each swatch. *You can peek through the circle to help choose colors for projects or when shopping for new markers.

***Bring this swatch with you when you shop to avoid buying duplicate color and to make sure you are purchasing colors that will work with what you have. Update your swatch when you get new markers.

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Coloring tips:

  • Choose a light, medium and dark version of a color for blending. I like to work dark to light but if your paper doesn’t blend well prime an area with the lightest color first and then work dark to light.
  • If you have limited colors or you are not happy with your marker colors you can enhance with darker or lighter colored pencils.
  • A white pen is handy for bright highlights and shine.

One more thing!

The Ohuhu markers I mention above are a great value at about 50 cents a marker but I know many of you are looking for brush tip markers because they are softer and make blending large areas easier and I just saw that Consumer Crafts has their Studio 71 alcohol markers that feature a brush tip on one end and chisel on the other on sale this week! I have a review of that brand with swatched and blending recipes here if interested.

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Prices on the Studio 71 brush tip alcohol marker sets are good through April 1st while supplies last. You really can’t beat it for $1 per marker or less! I have the 48 pack and it is really comprehensive.

How to create a rainbow blend with inexpensive markers (water based or alcohol!)

Hi friends! Today I have a video that is part review and part tutorial. I have a couple of sets of markers to review but I also wanted to make the video a useful tutorial on blending. Also I was curious about what kind or marker was quicker to color with. I also wanted to try to achieve the same look with different kids of markers to see how they did.  If you are ready for all of that high-speed marker action buckle up and let’s go!

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There is lots of info in this post, let’s start off with the video:

Supplies: (Affiliate links used. Products provided for review)

Review of the Arrtx Alcohol Markers

pros:

  • Price: 80 color for under $34
  • Color selection
  • Blends well
  • Dual tip (chisel & Bullet)
  • Beautiful & sturdy carring case
  • Colors are very juicy, no dry ones.
  • Easy to tell the chisel and bullet ends because they have square and round color chips respectively. Color chips are pretty accurate but I still recommend swatching.
  • Attractive matte white square barrel (non-roll)

Cons:

  • No brush tip
  • No colorless blender in set
  • caps may be difficult to remove if you have arthritis
  • Caps do not post (you can’t stick the cap on the end of the marker to hold it when coloring)
  • As with most low-priced markers there is no open stock option (although they use the same numbering system as Concept at Jerry’s Artarma so you could get a replacement color if you needed too, it would look different tho)
  • Non refillable

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Card made with the butterfly colored with the Arrtx Alcohol markers. Time spent colring the butterfly: 11 minutes, 30 seconds

These markers are beautiful to look at and color nicely. They remind me of the quality of Ohuhu and they even use the same color number system. Many of the lower priced markers available now are using the same numbering system, I reckon it is because all of the inks are being made in the same factory in China. I have not seen this marker barrel style anywhere before and honestly I really like have the two distinct ends because I can quickly uncap the nib I need whereas with Copics and other markers I often get the wrong end even with the gray band they have for identifying. This saves me time and I like that. Below you will find my color chart for the set of 80 Arrtx alcohol markers.

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Here are the colors I used (in order of appearance) to blend the alcohol marker butterfly: 13, 14, 16, 18, 22, 23, 33, 35, 37, 48, 49, 59, 58, 68, 67, 147, 76  *If you have other markers that use the same color number system great! Use what you have OR use the swatch chart to figure out what colors to use from your stash. If you want to order this set you can here.

Review of Arrtx Watercolor Real Brush Pens 48 color set

Pros:

  • Great color selection
  • Low price (even among other budget priced watercolor marker pens)
  • Caps post (you can stick the marker cap on the end while coloring so you don’t lose it)
  • All colors have a number on the end for identification
  • Includes a reusable plastic carring case

Cons:

  • Non refillable and no open stock options

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Card made with the butterfly colored with the Arrtx real brush pen water based markers. Time spent coloring the butterfly: 6 minutes, 50 seconds

These markers performed well as I would expect. I did have an issue with the plastic color coming off one of the pens but I was able to reassemble it and stick it back into place and I could feel some of the innards of the brush pens moving around so it doesn’t feel as good quality as the Zig Real Brush pens but they are less than half the price. The ink flowed smoothly, like other real brush pens I have used. These are on-par with the Arteza real brush pens but about $10 cheaper. If you already have those, or any other real brush pens, I don’t think these will be very different but if you are looking to try some they are a nice value. Below you will find my swatch of this set:

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These are the markers I used on the watercolor butterfly in order of appearance: 18, 5, 4, 3, 27, 226, 28, 25, 125, 36, 238, 7. Feel free to use the swatch as a reference for matching the colors to what you have or if you want to buy this set you can here.

Review of TouchNew Skintone marker set of 24

Pros:

  • Great selection of earth/skin/hair tones which are often lacking in marker sets.
  • Price (under $17 for 24 markers)
  • Dual tipped
  • Cloth carry bag included
  • Comes with a colorless blender

Cons:

  • No brush nib
  • Bullet tips were dry on a couple of my markers
  • Caps do not post
  • No open stock or refills (but you can order Concept markers from Jerry’s to replace a color)

These markers use the same numbering system as the Arrtx alcohol markers as well as other budget brands. The marker style is the same as the original Ohuhu markers who recently changed to an oval barrel that seems to keep the marker fresher as I had a few of the old style Ohuhu pens go dry prematurely.) I recommend storing them on their sides so the bullet tip doesn’t dry out and having denatured alcohol (or Copic blending solution) on hand in case you need to refresh them.  If you need a set of skintone markers to fill in your set these are a good value but I’d check the color numbers to make sure they are not all duplicates to what you have if you already own markers with the same numbering system. Also because one of the marker is a colorless blender you are really only getting 23 colors. I wish these had brush tips though it is so much easier to blend with a brush tip and you want to be able to get really smooth skin and tones. To be honest tho, if you already had a set of 80 or higher of the Arrtx or Ohuhu alcohol markers I think I would pass on these are there are duplicates and consider investing in a couple of Copic brush tip skin tone markers as you need them because in this instance I think it would be more enjoyable and cheaper long-term to get a refillable marker that performs better. If you have a smaller set of assorted markers this 24 set would go a long way to fill in gaps. It really boils down to what you already have for markers and how much you intend to use them.

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I hope you found this helpful and if you have markers I hope you try creating a rainbow blend. It is a great technique for learning to blend and it’s fun too! Or practice blending colors in general and write down your successful recipes so you can duplicate them later. The truth of truths with markers (especial alcohol markers) is that is takes practice and there is a learning curve to them so don’t jump from brand to brand thinking that one is going to make you a superstar. In fact it could harm your progress as you get used to one kind and then when you try another it’s like relearning because it is a bit juicier or the nib is harder or softer. You have to put in the time. Speaking of time wasn’t it interesting how much quicker the water based markers were to color with? I really wanted to do the comparison because I was curious but also to share that if you are not into spending lots of time coloring you might prefer a waterbased marker. Well, this post is long enough, have a great night and til next time happy crafting!

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