DIY Inktense Palette & My First Facebook Live with Demo and Q&A

Hi friends! I tried out Facebook live yesterday and did a live demo of a watering can with flowers in a loose style. I painted it with Inktense blocks but you can use watercolors.

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I know not everyone is on Facebook (especially These days!) but it is much easier for me to see your questions during a live stream so I might pop in once a month and do a live Q&A kinda like the old “Ask a Crafter” videos I used to do so if you are interested in that be sure to like and follow by Frugal Crafter Community Facebook page. To make sure you don’t miss a live event click like, then follow and click see first. I plan on posting the replay on my blog here but if you want to interact live you will need to follow on Facebook.

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Here is the video from yesterday:

Here is a video showing how I made the palette:

I had a full set of inktense blocks and pencils as well as a small set of 12 that a sweet viewer had sent me years ago when I was unsure if I wanted to get the full set. I like them enough to buy the set of 72 but having doubles I felt silly investing in another duplicate product just because it was a different format. Plus I couldn’t even find the Inktense pan set to purchase. Honestly I use the pencils more than the blocks anyway so I figured I could sacrifice some of the blocks to go in the palette and as an extra bonus all of my loose blocks fit in my large Inkense block tin so less storage space!

So you are probably wondering how these differ from watercolors? Well, to be honest I prefer watercolors. I find Inktense to be vibrant but yet it’s chalky and I find this chalky quality more in the block than in the pencil although they are purportedly the same thing. The big attribute to inktense is that after you paint with it on paper (and it dries completely) it bonds permanently with the paper so you can layer over it without if reactivating. That’s a boon to mixed media artists who want to keep working on a project without disturbing the layers underneath. You can use watercolor over inktense as it won’t repel the media because it dries matte. My top recommendation for the inktense line will always be the pencils but knowing how you like to use media can help you choose the right thing for you. I hope you enjoyed this craft hack and live rebroadcast. If you would like to catch my next live endeavor I will be doing a guest live stream on the LAVA soap facebook page at 2pm ET today where I will show you how to make your own Acrylic pouring medium and we will do an acrylic pour. The stream will last about 15 minutes. I’m a bit nervous so wish me luck! Have a great day and til next time happy crafting!

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DIY “Peerless” Style Watercolors Tutorial

Hi Friends! I had a request the other day on the facebook page to make faux Peerless watercolors. Peerless watercolors are dye watercolors that come on small rectangles of paper. They were mainly used for photo tinting but lately stampers have been using them for coloring because it is easy to control the amount of color you get.Here is a card I colored with my faux Peerless palette. The rose stamp is from Lost Coast Designs.

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I really loved the ease of coloring. You can use almost any water-media you have to make a Peerless style travel palette but I had the most luck with my Inktense blocks and traditional watercolors. See how I did it:

The dye reinker and marker attempts never dried fully, even days later. You can also use watercolor pencils and crayons or gouache. If you can’t get the Yupo paper I used try laminating cardstock or use a report cover or transparency. If the paint doesn’t want to stick you can lightly sand the plastic first. Yupo is designed to be used with watercolor so no treatment is required. I liked the sample I made with my set of 12 inktense blocks so much I swatched out my set of 72 and it did not make a dent in my blocks! I love that I can take my full set of colors with me while leaving my set of blocks safely at home. since the Yupo paper is thin I attached it to a file folder.

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This is a great idea for classes and supply sharing too since we rarely use up our watercolor pencils and crayons!

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So you are probably wondering why anyone would buy real Peerless paints if you can make these so easily, well, I reckon that the peerless watercolors have more paint on the swatches and they are super transparent because they are a dye. I will probably have to reload my inktense palette many times to equal amount of use I would get from a stack of peerless sheets. I’d love to try them someday but this works for me and my budget right now! Plus it is always good to use what you have. Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

Tutorial: Using Chalk Pastels to Stamp!

Howdy folks! My crafty mojo made an appearance today while I was playing with my chalk pastels.

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It got me to thinking, chalk ink is expensive but you can get  set of student grade chalk (aka soft) pastels at the craft store for cheap (48 for $10) so I used said cheap pastels to stamp with, have a look:

Extra bonus, this is a technique that I would use the expensive inktense blocks with and the pastels work just as well and they are more in the price range of average crafters. What’s more most of us have some type of pastel or decorator chalk in our stash from 10 years ago when it was all the rage (yes, if you can pop those suckers out of the palette they came in you can use them!)

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I love that you can stamp on dark-colored cardstock with these too! Is there no end to the fun we can have with these inexpensive goodies? Now, I got a lot of questions on YouTube about whether the stamped image needs to be sealed. Well, before I took the photos I rubbed may hand over the images, no smudging at all. Another reason I would not seal them is that it might darken the color or make them disappear on dark cardstock, also sometimes fixatives will make paper brittle over time (especially if you are a cheap skate like me and use Aqua-Net as a sealer LOL!)

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So there you have it! Another use for an old product you probably already have, if not you can obtain them cheaply. I spied many sets that looked pretty good for under $10 at my local ACmoore. Look for rich, vivid colors and you can’t go wrong. In case you are wondering if you should spend big bucks on artist grade pastels ask yourself this: Are you going to paint a picture with them? Do you have children who will share them with you? Do you have proper ventilation? I love artist grade pastels and I paint with them. The colors will last longer because they contain pigments, some of which are toxic such as cobalt, cadmium, and other baddies and you shouldn’t breathe the dust. You don’t have to worry so much about student grade products because they are non-toxic, I don’t recommended breathing the dust on purpose or anything but they are a lot safer and the results will still be lovely. Chances are if you are using them in a scrapbook, journal or card they will not be hanging in direct sunlight for an extended period of time either, the cheap stuff is fine for this, BTW all of the chalk in the scrapbook “archival” aisle is the cheap stuff with a bigger price tag. You’re welcome.  I hope this project unleashed some creativity in you today, feel free to share what you have created by leaving a link in the comments, I’d love to see! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

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