Art Deco Inspired Faux Stained Glass Vase

Hi friends! Grab an old jar out of the recycling bin and let’s make a pretty stained glass vase!

I am using this to propagate a begonia and it is so pretty sitting on my windowsill! This project is very easy and you can even do this with kids! Watch the video to see how and check out the end of this post for other DIY ideas to make this project even more affordable!

Sponsored by Smart Art Box. Visit their website to purchase a subscription, see available past boxes and see what countries they ship to. You can purchase the July box here while supplies last.

Frugal Tips!

  • I used store-bought glass paint but you can make glass paint by mixing white glue or glossy Mod-Podge with ink or food coloring. This DIY version may fade eventually but it is a less toxic alternative for kids and cheap too!
  • You can use dimensional fabric paint (like the Tulip puff paint) to draw the leading lines and it’s only about $1 a bottle.
  • You can work directly on the glass instead of using the Duralar film, it will adhere fine, it was just easier for me to trace the design with the film.
  • Another “stained glass” option for little ones is to use bits of cut up colored tissue paper and glue them to jars, it’s pretty!

I hope you enjoyed this project and til next time happy crafting!

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These beads are fun to make with paint and glue!

Hi friends! Tonight I have slightly messy, totally fun bead making craft!

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These beads and pendants are made with acrylic skins, I used acrylic paint and mod-podge (you could use PVA glue or gel medium if you wish) to make the fruit-roll-up like sheets of acrylic and then covered things with them. Doesn’t that sound like fun? It is! I’ll show you how in today’s video!

Supplies:
1. Acrylic Paint
2. Glossy Mod Podge or PVA Glue
3. Aluminum foil Tape or regular stuff from the kitchen
4. Cardboard
5. Silicone mat or waxed paper
5. Jewelry findings of your choice.

Directions:
1. Pour mod podge in cap, add a few drops of paint ad stir 3 times. Pour on waxed paper or silicone mat and spread it around. Let dry for 2 days. This is your faux stained glass acrylic skin.
2. Cut cardboard to the size and shape you want your charm to be and cover in aluminum foil.
3. Cut up the acrylic skin and glue to foil covered cardboard.
4. Cover the edges of the charm with thin strips of foil tape if desired.
5. For the beads cut up a drinking straw and cover with acrylic skin strips. Trim the straw.
6. Use beads and charms in jewelry projects.

If you like this project check out my glitter glue earring tutorial. Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

 

Embossed Acetate How-to Video & a Stamp Giveaway!

Howdy there!  I’m so happy today because I get to give away the beautiful Camellia Background stamp from About Art Accents I used on this card (a brand new one though) and all you need to do is leave a comment on this post to have a chance at winning. I’ll draw a name next Tuesday so be sure to sign up before then. Have you ever tried to heat emboss transparencies or vellum and ended up with a warped mess? Well, no more! I’ll show you how to do it right today even with the thinnest materials!

DCF 1.0

I used ink-jet transparencies on my project because one side has a coating that will allow ink or watercolors to dry on it, just like it does with printer ink. If you are using regular overhead transparencies or un-coated acetate you can still do this but instead of painting the backside with watercolors use acrylic paint and let it dry naturally. Watch the video to learn this technique and complete the card!

My favorite part about this card is how it shines, shimmers and changes depending on how it catches the light, photos do not do it justice.

DCF 1.0

I hope you enjoyed this technique and give it a try! Thanks for stopping by and till next time happy crafting!

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