How To Tint Glass at Home {Super Easy!}

Hi friends! Sometimes you come across a really cool techniques when you are trying to do something else, this is one of those times!

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I got tired of my watercolor brushes rolling off my table as I worked and also It’s better (according to experts) to dry your brushes flat rather than in a cup so I thought I would like a brush rest. Since I am cheap frugal I decided I could probably find a really funky colored glass ashtray at the local antiques mall that would be delightful (and cheap) for this job. Believe it or not I only saw one ashtray at the antiques place and it was not delightful but I did find two shallow clear pressed glass bowls with fluted edges that would do the trick. Best of all was the price $1.25 for the set! Score!

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Above you can see the lovely tinted glass I eventually ended up with. I loved the technique so much I also tinted a glass flower frog (I have two of these large clear ones so I figured “why not?”) and that can hold pencils or crayons that I am using in a  project so I can keep track of what I use. Originally I thought I would try to get a really rich deep color but after using a bunch of ink I was really unhappy with it.

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As I went to clean off the thick ink it left behind a tint and it was beautiful! Sometimes you have to go through that “Hot Mess” to get to the good stuff! Want to try this for yourself? Watch the video and see how!

Supplies! *Amazon affiliate links used

  • Some clear class objects *items with a cut, pressed or embossed design work great!
  • Alcohol ink *This is a good mixing set or you can get smaller sets of the Ranger inks.
  • “Rubbing” alcohol in a spray bottle (*I used 70% from the drugstore, grocery store or dollar store)
  • Small square of craft felt and q-tips for applying color *I make my own craft felt applicator but cutting up 9″x12″ sheets of acrylic craft felt into 1″ squares, you can also buy them cut into squares by Ranger but they are more expensive
  • *You might want rubber gloves, LAVA soap will remove all of the ink from your skin but your fingernails can get stained!

Directions:
1. Wash the glass and then wipe it down with rubbing alcohol to remove any fingerprints.

2. On the underside of the dish (or inside of a jar or vase) dab or wipe on the ink using a small piece of craft felt. You can use a Q-tip to get into any nooks and crannies. If the color is too dark add some alcohol to the blending felt to dilute the color.

3. Let dry before displaying.20180512_220030

*You want to do this on the bottom or inside of the object because alcohol ink can have a dull look on the surface, this way the shiny class will be on the outside and the glass will appear to be colored all the way through. You can even put water in the jar or vase after it is colored, just take care when cleaning it by washing with a soft cloth.

This is not food safe and you really should hand wash these. If you change your mind about the color or want the glass to be clear again you can wash off the ink with alcohol.

One thing I forgot to mention in the video…

I got this question a lot on YouTube when I posted this video: “What can I use to seal the ink?” I want to be able to remove the ink if I want a new color so I did not seal it with any top coat. This ink is waterproof and should be fine with normal wear and art room splashes. Since I have colored beads and pendants with alcohol ink I noticed that the color can wear off with a lot of rubbing.  Also I have used alcohol ink on coasters and it definitely needs more protection so what I would recommend if you are sure you do not want to be able to wash it off is to spray a coat of Krylon Triple Thick Glaze over the ink. It still is not food safe though. I hope you give this a try, it is really addictive and the results are so pretty! Happy crafting!

 

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