Fancy Card Edges: Stamp School!

Hi friends! A fun and simple way to dress up a card is to shape the edges. You can use scissors, punches, or even die cuts to do this. After shaping the edges you can embossing them as well to enhance the effect!

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Learn this technique and make this quick and easy card today!

Video!

This video is sponsored by Rubber Stamp Tapestry! Use coupon code: LINDSAY17 – 20% off peg stamps and peg stamp sets on orders of $10 or more.

Supplies:

Remember if you don’t have dies you can hand cut your edge like I showed in this tutorial.  I hope you enjoyed this video and til next time happy crafting!

 

1 Die 4 Ways!

Hi friends! We all want to get more use out of our supplies right? Today I have used 1 die (and only 1 pass through the die cutter to create 4 different effects!)

Video!

I know there is some controversy over using waxed paper on die cuts, if you are worried about that or do not have waxed paper you can use a plastic bag instead: Tip courtesy of Cheery Lynn Designs. I like that I was able to finish two cards with this technique that would be appropriate for a man or woman and it saved me some time too! Have a great weekend and til next time happy crafting!

Simple cardmaking with die cuts! #thefrugalcrafterlindsayweirich #thefrugalcrafter #cardmaking

A post shared by Lindsay Weirich (@lindsayweirich) on

Stamp School 12: Talkin’ ’bout Dies & Die Cutting Machine!

Hi friends! Tonight I have a very broad general video about they types of dies and die cutting machines (computerized/electronic vs. manual) and what each kind is good for. Keep in mind the machines I use are about 8 years old and they are still doing everything I need them to do so I have not upgraded. I may have been a bit harsh and unfair of a certain brand of cutter (due to my past experience with the company but newer customers are saying they are great now) so I do intend to provide a more thorough discussion of die cutters. I actually am looking to do a google hangout with some advanced die cut machine users so we can have a discussion of different machines and you can ask questions live. If you know of a crafter I should ask to be a guest let me know. Now here is a very general discussion on die cutters.

OK, so maybe I was a bit harsh on Cricut but having to be connected to the internet is a deal breaker for me. I did just find out that the new Scan and Cut can be hooked to your computer for fonts and SVGs now (oh the temptation!) but I have not used the Scan ‘n Cut, I am merely drooling over others recommendation. I mentioned the blog Clever Someday as a great resource of several popular die cutting machines, Kay also has great tutorials, I have learned a lot from her, if you want more info on computerized die cutters check her out. If you want to watch the Google Hangout live make sure to follow me on Google+ because I can send an invite to everyone that follows me I think… I will likely post it here and Facebook as well. Also you can post a question here in the comments if you can’t make it but live questions will be answered first. I am hoping to do this in a day or two so stay tuned.

But today I wanted to go over the basic advantages each type of machine has:

Electronic/Computerized Cutter (pros & cons)

  • (con) larger initial investment $250-$500 for consumer models
  • (pro) ability to cut designs in the size you want
  • (pro) most let you cut computer fonts you have (or can download free or cheaply)
  • (pro) most let you easily convert clip art into cutting files
  • (pro) it gets cheaper the longer you use it because once you buy the machine you can do a lot without spending another dime
  • (pro) you can make cutting files to cut stamped images *with some machines, difficulty will vary.
  • (con) steeper learning curve than manual machine
  • (con) blades and mats will need replacing
  • (con) if something goes wrong it will probably be expensive to fix
  • Best for cutting thinner/less dense materials but deep cut blades are available

Manuel Machines

  • (pro) smaller initial investment $60-$300 depending on fanciness
  • (pro) cuts with dies and embosses with embossing folders and texture plates (and stencils!)
  • (pro) little learning curve other and figuring what plates you need for pressure.
  • (con) you get what you get, no adjusting the sizes, if you want a bigger shape you need a bigger die.
  • (con) you have to keep buying dies if you want more shapes
  • (pro) easily cuts through thicker items with thick dies
  • (pro) there is not much to go wrong with them especially if you invest in a quality machine, I’ve been using my Big Shot daily for 8 years with no trouble
  • (pro) no blades to replace but you will need to replace the cutting pads occasionally
  • (pro) can be used with letterpress plates
  • Best for the crafter who does not want to mess with a computer when crafting and likes to cut thicker materials

I hope that helped a bit. Stay tuned for a more in-depth discussion. I will have the recording available if you can’t make it to the hangout, it will be my first live youtube thing so wish me luck! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

How to store it: Die Cutting/Embossing Stuff!

Hi Friends! I am still shooting and uploading the organization videos, who would have thought there was so many ways to store your craft supplies? Today I am going to show you how I store my die cutting stuff. I will show you where I keep my cricut (I have it on another record cabinet so the mat can more freely around and not collide with other things on my die cutting bench), big shot, wafer thin and thick steel rule dies, embossing folders, sizzlits, letterpress plates, cutting pads and other accessories that pertain to using out die cutting machines. I will even show you my laminator that for some funny reason I like to keep here, I think it is because it takes electricity and it is handy here. Some things just work, don’t question it. If I used my comb binding machine more often it would be here too but I only have that out on rare occasion so it sits on a high shelf with other supplies I don’t need often. If you have any questions about my die cutting area you can leave them in the comments. I hope you find this video helpful:)

Oh! I have say a HUGE thank you to everyone who voted for me in the Craftsy Blogger Awards! You guys are so awesome!!! Voting is open until January 30th, wish me luck! Thanks so much for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

Patriotic Platform {shoes?}

Howdy friends, wow, it has been super busy here! I have so many projects in the works but none completed right now so I thought I’d share these quick tags I made using dies from Cheery Lynn Designs:

DCF 1.0

I cut the steampunk shoe out of 3 colors of cardstock and pieced them together on text paper and there they sat in a pile for a month. While cleaning last weekend I found them again and put them on a tag. There. I finished something. Now I feel quite virtuous. So, go ahead, finish something! It feels so good! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

3 Cheers for Cheery Lynn & a Tip to “Die” for!

Happy Friday folks! A couple weeks ago I showed you how to cut an intricate die, a beautiful doily die from Cheery Lynn. I had struggled with that die but finally found a method that worked in my “antique” but hard used machine. Well, the president of Cheery Lynn Designs saw my valiant attempt and sent me a platform for my big shot. Apparently they don’t make the platform I was using anymore (it’s rather vintage you know) but I could not see how a new platform would be better than my old platform shimmed with cereal boxes and roof flashing…OK, maybe I can see how. He also through in 3 die sets and a real steel metal shim to play with. Well, do you want to see how they work? Well, have a gander at today’s video:

I didn’t think having a new platform would make a difference but really it is like having a whole new machine. If you Big shot/Big Kick is newer than mine it probably would have come with the tabbed platform, if not you might want to consider it if you like to use wafer thin dies. If not a cereal box and roof flashing does the trick LOL! The metal shim really helped the die cut, I think since my machine is 8 years old the rollers might have loosened up a bit making the dies not so tight. My aluminum flashing worked well too but if you have a magnetic platform you would want the steel one to keep your dies in place. BTW, now that I have the new tabbed platform and I don’t need the old one I am going to see if I can figure out how to turn it into a magnetic one, my husbands countersink drill bits and rare earth magnets are going to come in really handy this weekend! All of the dies from Cheery Lynn Designs cut like butter and the flourish die got an extra workout as my friend Kathy used it to cut a bunch for birthday invites.  I have some cards in progress with the steampunk high heel die he sent too, I’ll share them later. I am really glad I gave thin dies another chance, you just need the right tool for the job. Thank you Mike for sending me some fun new dies and accessories to play with, you can check out the offerings of Cheery Lynn Designs on their website.

Now for a $$$ saving tip! If you have old, bowed die cut pads I’ll show you how to clean and flatten them, no special tools required!

I hope I inspired you to straiten up those die cutting plates and go make a card! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

Flip it, Flip it good!

Howdy friends! Have you ever heard of a flip-flop, swing, flip it or swivel card? The idea has been around in the stamping community for ages and I have examples here (with a tutorial to make it with a paper trimmer) and here (to make it with a plastic template) but I got really excited when I saw dies to make them with fancy shaped windows. When I saw that the dies cost $30 a pop I decided that I would try to do it with the thin dies I already have. It is easy really, all you have to do is make a jig for your die-cutter and I will show you how in today’s video:

Can you imaging paying $30 for 1 die that will cut one shape in one size for a very specific kind of card? No way! I can get a set of nesting dies for less than that and 2-3 sets if they are on sale and they can be used for other things too! Now I can make a swing card in any shape and size I have a thin die for, cool huh? In the defense of the $30 Flip-It dies they are thick Movers & Shapers dies and if you were making a ton of cards the same shape and size (think wedding invites or owning a stationary business) it would be a good buy because you could cut several sheets of cardstock at once. But, for the occasional cardmaker or hobbyist I think making your thin dies work a little overtime is just fine. Oh no, I am drinking the thin die Kool-aid…I’ve crossed over to the darkside…will this insanity ever end? LOL! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

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