Ice Dye Baby!

Hi friends! When I was recently rummaging through my supplies I came across a couple of tie-dye kits. I had intended to make some matching T-shirts with my kids to wear on a trip but my teens quickly shot down that idea calling it “cringy” and so the supplies sat in my drawer unloved until now! I vaguely remember hearing about a technique called ice dying and I was curious to give it a try. Watch the video and see how it went and what techniques got the best results!

Supplies (affiliate links used)

  • Powder dye (any brand, just make sure it is powder, not liquid when you get it)
  • T Shirts or 100% cotton fabric
  • Lots of ice cubes
  • Soda ash (or table salt if you don’t have it) Rubber gloves *should come in tie-dye kit
  • Other: Plastic to protect your work area
  • Cookie sheets or some sort of grate to elevate the fabric for best results These are the ones I have and they have legs to elevate the fabric.

Tips:

  • Soak the fabric in hot water and soda ash so the colors will hold.
  • Elevate the fabric for best results. If you don’t have means to elevate the fabric I suggest doing a regular tie-dye technique because it will look just as good if not better and use less dye so you can do more fabric.
  • The longer the dye sits the stronger the color will be. The color will appear much darker [when dying] than it will turn out.
  • Be sure to rinse all dye from the fabric and hang to dry.
  • The first few times you wash your fabric wash it separately by and so and dye can’t transfer to another laundry.

This is a great project to do with your kid outside while the weather is nice and a fun way to cool off too! Some viewers had great ideas on elevating a bunch of fabric such as putting palettes, fence sections or chicken wire on cinder blocks and laying your fabric on that. I am sure you can find something around your home that will work just as well. Have fun and til next time happy crafting!

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It’s Trendy and You Can Do It Using Supplies You Already Have!

Hi friends!  Since Christmas I have been going through all of my art and craft supplies and seeing what I have, use and need to let go of. As you know I have a home based business and over the year things can accumulate. Plus I get asked to review a lot of products that turn out the be the same as other stuff I already have. I tend to have a bit of a hoarding tendency (I think all crafters do because we see potential in everything but this optimism can be out downfall sometimes LOL!) So I called a teacher that runs a drama program and she is taking some unneeded leftover paint, fabric and yarn off my hands and I feel good that my excess will get used. While going through my huge totes of yarn I found all of my embroidery floss and craft thread. It was in a large ziplock bag with copies of crochet patterns for little flower and butterfly patterns I used to like to make for embellishments for cards and scrapbook pages. I would haul this bag of supplies with me everywhere and crochet up a storm. I realized when I did my huge Konmari clean out of 2017 I never touched the yarn totes. I guess I decided that the totes “sparked joy” as is and there was no need to open them (HaHa! What a naughty cheater I was!) but I did go through them last weekend and found lots of treasures! Both for me to keep and use and some to give away. I almost didn’t open the floss bag, I figured they were “organized enough” right were they were but then I thought I’d probably use them more if they were organized by color and I had a couple empty clear tackle boxes in storage so I decided to get to work!

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As soon as I started running my fingers over the smooth colorful threads I knew I wanted to use them! Any new skeins I sorted by color in flat open clear boxes and any open skeins I untangled and wrapped around cardboard bobbins and put in a divided tackle box by color. I will look first to the bobbin thread and if I don’t have the color I need I’ll go to a new skein and wrap the excess on a bobbin. When I crochet flowers I try to use up a whole skein in one go making about 3 mini flowers. One of my first ever YouTube videos was of me making the crochet flowers LOL! Remember that old camera that made me sound like I had a lisp? I redid a flower tutorial in my Crochet Basics video that might be better if you are brand new to crochet. I started thinking about how stitching was really popular right now in the cardmaking world and about all of the specialty products (stamps and dies) sold to incorporate stitching in your cards. These cards are pretty but I know I wouldn’t probably do it a lot so it would be foolish to invest in something so specific so I used what I had and made these cards:

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The stamp set I am using is Apple of my Eye by Stampin up. It seemed to be retired soon after it was released but I really liked it. I sometimes wonder if stamps get discontinued because they are unpopular or because they are trying to urge people to buy now. Stampin up keeps some stamp sets around for years so maybe it was unpopular, who knows? If you don’t have this set you can use any stamp you like that has a bold image. It doesn’t have to be fruit but I think fruit is fun for this technique because it reminds me of vintage embroidered tea towels. The technique I’ll show you today is satin stitch and backstitch. It is just like embroidery but when working on paper there are a  few things to keep in mind so it doesn’t tear through. Watch the video to learn more!

Supplies: (Keep in mind many supplies may be discontinued. As always feel free to substitute. You will get truly original cards that way! I have tried my best to find all the supplies I used and affiliate links may be provided.)

  • Stamps (Apple of my Eye by Stampin Up) *This set is retired but used sets can be found on ebay or Etsy
  • Jillybean Soup Lemonade stamp set
  • Small wood fruit stamps (Michael’s Dollar Bin)
  • Embroidery floss or craft thread *I recommend craft thread if you like to crochet with it as the threads are wounds together like yearn as opposed the floss where you can split the skein into smaller threads but either will work equally as well for this project.
  • White cardstock
  • Dye ink cubes (Gina K)
  • Dye markers (Ohuhu)
  • Dye for focal point (spellbinders label 22)
  • Ribbon polkadot (citrus slice ribbon is by American Crafts but I can’t find it anywhere)
  • Enamel Dots *Here is a diy video!
  • Foam squares

It feels so good to use what you have. You can erase any guilt associated with a purchase by using it. Then you can feel good again by mailing your creation off to a friend or family member! Remember, you bought these supplies to USE them! Besides, I’m pretty sure consumable supplies like embroidery floss multiply when you are not looking so don’t worry about running out LOL! I don’t know what goes on in my craft room when I leave for the night! I hope you found this post inspiring and if you have suggestions for older supplies you would like to see used and made new again let me know in the comments below. Happy crafting!

The Old Coat…

Last weekend I did a bit of sewing that I didn’t share. Honestly, it wasn’t that interesting to anyone by me but I thought I’d share the story as it might motivate you.

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Twenty years ago I was fairly fresh out of college and working in my chosen field of radio broadcasting making about $5.50 an hour, working odd overnight and early morning airshifts and the odd DJ gig at various bars and roller skating rinks. If it sounds glamorous let me assure you it was! I was being paid in fun and for a 21-year-old you really couldn’t ask for more. I needed a nice winter coat and it had to look smart because working in radio in the 90’s with deregulation and small stations being bought up by larger companies you never knew when you came in for work each day if you would have a job or if your station would have new owners and would have fired everyone. Hence I had to look good for my constant hobby of interviewing for new jobs. I went into TJ Maxx on a mission and found the most beautiful burgundy wool coat that was tailor-made for me it seemed. It was double-breasted, knee-length with a fabulous weight and the perfect color. It was also $60 so I thought long and hard about buying it as it was easily half of my take home pay that week. I bought it and never once regretted that purchase. I rarely carry a purse so my keys would rip holes in the pockets which I mended. I replaced buttons after they gave out from getting caught in the holes of my laundry baskets from my pre house owning trips to the laundromat and later getting caught in shopping carts lifting my kids for cart to car seat. That coat saw me through many adventures.

About 2 years ago I had to face facts, the pockets could no longer be mended and the lining was in tatters. Mending might not be able to cut it this time. Feeling fairly competent I bought a couple of yards of burgundy satin (for $8 at Mardens-a local discoutn fabric store) and a matching spool of thread and decided I would sew a new lining for my coat. Now, I am the type of person who needs to jump in and do a project the moment I get inspired because If I spend to long thinking about it or researching different ways to do it I get overwhelmed. I read too many tutorials, I asked to many proper sewists how they would do it and ultimately I did nothing.  The coat sat in my closet unworn while I grabbed lesser coats to wear outside. Because I felt fat and dumpy in my other coats I didn’t want to go out often in the cold. I didn’t pop into the library to grab a book and chat with the librarian when I was out, I didn’t feel good about myself in those coats so I would simply wait in the car to pick up my kids, heaven forbid if anyone saw me. All that wasted time, even if it was just a few minutes it was wasted.

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As you know over the past year I had held each of my possessions in my hand and asked if they “sparked joy” and my old red coat still made me happy yet I kept those other very “unsparky” coats because I needed something I could actually wear outside (and quite frankly if you are going to do any serious work or play outside in the snow you want a machine washable parka.) Because of undergoing the Konmari method from the book The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up I had fallen down the rabbit hole of other mindfulness and minimalism bloggers and last Saturday I happened to be reading an article about fast fashion. The article referenced a documentary on Netflix and I had a burst of motivation. I grabbed my sewing kit, beautiful coat and fabric and set to work on mending my coat as I watched the documentary. I started by cutting out the pockets and using them as templates to make new ones out of satin. I sewed them on my machine then hand stitched them in to my coat. I examined the lining which was the most overwhelming task and realized that most of the tears were on seams so I hand stitched the small awkward rips and machine sewed the rest. Turns out it was not as big of a project as I thought! By the end of the hour and a half documentary (which was not that great) I had a fully functional coat! I dug out my Dryell home dry cleaning kit that I haven’t used in over a decade and cleaned my coat (and I was super excited to see they still make Dryell! It is such a fantastic invention!) and it looked fabulous. I realized it had lost a button at some point but I had a matching one in my stash so I stitched that on and it was as good as new. Maybe better than new because the satin I made the pockets from was thicker and sturdier than the original. It also made me glad I didn’t rip out the lining because I think the satin might have been too stiff to work as a lining fabric. Here is my 22-year-old coat as good as new and still my favorite!

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The old saying goes: “They don’t make them like they used to…” and in this case I agree. I had tried on other coats over the years thinking that I could just replace my old beloved red wool coat but the coats I found felt cheap, flimsy and just didn’t feel right or make me feel the way I wanted to in them. I think we often try to buy something because we think it will rekindle the feeling we had when we bought a similar thing. That’s why fast fashion has such popularity, you can buy something new and cheap to replace something old and dull but the novelty soon wears off. I think that the amount of thought you put into a purchase is related to the enjoyment you will get out of it.

I have grown a lot over the past year of decluttering. Two years ago when I bought the fabric and spool of thread to take on this project I thought I was being smart and thrifty. Turns out I already had a spool of thread in the exact color I needed and I only really needed enough fabric to make pockets and not replace the entire lining. I could have done this repair with 1/4 yard of fabric at $1 vs the 2 yards of fabric plus spool of thread for $10. Also I would have actually done the project quickly because I would not have been hung up on what I thought I needed to do instead of what I really needed to do.  Still its way less wasteful and less expensive than buying a new coat of that quality which would cost about $200. I hope this post inspires you to tackle a task you have been meaning to do but overwhelmed by. Do what needs to be done and enjoy life now. It’s usually less work than you think it will be and always worth it because even if you mess up a project you learn something new! What are you going to do today? Let me know in the comments below and til next time happy crafting!

Sew a Quilted Sketchbook & Pencil Wrap!

Hi friends! Today I have a fun sewing project for you using the quilt as you go (AKA fun and done) technique. We will make a sturdy cover to hold a sketchbook, pencils and other supplies.

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This is a fairly quick project to make and wonderful for beginners. Watch the step by step video to see how it’s done!

Sponsored by Annie’s Creative Quilters Fabric Club! Join today and get your first kit for $9.99 and three free gifts just for trying! Use coupon code “FRUGAL”.

Supplies:

  • 6 fat quarters of fabric in coordinating colors
  • Sewing machine threaded with coordinating color thread
  • Batting or felt for inner layer
  • Chalk
  • 1/4″ sewing elastic
  • Button
  • Needle and thread for hand sewing
  • Rotary cutter and quilting rulers/mat

Measurements to fit a 6″x9″ sketchbook (adjust to make other sizes)
Batting/felt: 10″x14″
1/4″ Elastic: 18″ long
Fabric: I stacked 5 of the fat quarters and cut a 3 1/2″ x 18″ strips. I cut the stack to 10 1/4″ for the body and I made the pocket from the remaining 7 3/4″ long strips.
Backing fabric 14″x18″ (this is the 6th fat quarter you didn’t cut)

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Directions:
1. Center the batting/felt on the backing fabric and sew down the strips using the quilt as you go method shown in the video.

2. Sew the shorter strips together to make a larger piece of fabric for the pocket.

3. Trim the excess backing fabric to an even 1″ all the way around and fold-over twice to overlap the striped side of the fabric neatly and press to make a nice looking binding. *Trim excess fabric from the corners to avoid bulk.

4. Press seams flat on the pocket fabric, fold it in half long-ways and stitch closed on the long side and one short side. Turn right-side out and tuck raw ends in.

5. Stitch down binding as neatly as you can.

6. Sew pocket on the backing side of the quilted project.

7. Mark a straight line on backing fabric where you want the elastic to run and sew on the elastic every 1″ or so. Leave a loop at the end for closing.

8. Hand sew a button on the striped side of the fabric where the elastic starts.

9. Divide the pocket if desired by sewing. Measure to make sure the sketchbook will fit.

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I hope you found this project inspiring. I have several people mention that they would love to make something like this but did not have a sewing machine. While you can hand-stitch the project I think an easier method for hand sewists would be to find a fabric place mat and fold up one edge to from the pocket and hand stitch on the elastic. It would save you some seams and still be sturdy! Will you make this project? Let me know in the comments below! Til next time happy crafting!

2 Custom Cloth Crafts! {Great gift ideas!}

Hi friends! Today I have a couple of fun ideas that you can make from inexpensive raw canvas or other fabric you like! Raw canvas is a great supply to have on hand. I get mine from our local discount fabric store and I use it for making custom sized stretched canvases to paint on as well as other rugged garments and crafts. Today I am going to show you how to make custom canvas art and a tote bag that you can customize with iron on transfers.

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The technique I show you for stretching the canvas is the same if you were going to make a stretched canvas to paint on, after stretching the fabric on the frame simply prime it. I will also show you how to sew a tote bag but you can also purchase raw canvas totes if you don’t want to go to the trouble (they might even be cheaper to buy than make.)  Feel free to use the tote bag directions to make fancy bags with printed (even the pretty double-sided quilted material you can get at the fabric store) fabric if that is more your style!

And now on to the tutorial!

This tutorial is sponsored by Tomato ink offering inexpensive, high quality and environmentally friendly products such as ink, toner, papers and more! Save 8% on your entire order with code: 3TSWIM8 through 7/31/17 or join their mailing list for deeper discounts!

Supplies:

  • Canvas
  • Stretcher bars or wooden frame
  • Sewing machine and thread
  • Iron on transfer film
  • Heavy Duty Stapler (Power Shot)
  • Household iron and ironing board (or heat press)
  • *Saw tooth hook or eye screws and wire to hang the canvas art
  • Computer and printer
  • Vintage clip art such as this one I downloaded from graphics fairy

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You can use iron on transfer film to customize inexpensive blank T-shirts for group trips or other events too! Or make a tote bag for your kids library books. The possibilities are endless! If you have other ideas to adapt this project leave it in the comments below. I always forget how much I enjoy sewing and I’d love to do some more projects! Happy crafting!

DIY Cave-Girl Halloween Costume with Jewelry & Accessories!

Hi friends! Do you need a costume you can whip up in a flash? How about a comfy costume that you can wear over leggings and a turtleneck if the weather is cold? Today I have you covered with a DIY Cave Girl costume!

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You can make this costume and accesories in an evening for about $10-$20 depending on what you have around the house.

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Watch the video to see how!

Sponsored by Costume Yeti 2016 Halloween Costume Contest. Enter photos of your Halloween costume for a chance to win cash prizes totaling $8,700 now through November 12th, 2016. Also check out the entries if you are in need of a cute costume idea!

Here is what I used to make the Cave-Girl Costume:

Fabric: 2 yards of 60″ wide animal print fleece
Sewing machine and thread (optional-see tie method in the video)
For footwear you can wear boots or sandals

For the necklace:
18″ for tiger-tail wire
4 crimp beads
Small jasper chip beads
Larger stone nugget beads
Assorted dagger shaped plastic beads
Small lobster clasp

For the torch:
Tissue paper in yellow, orange and red
Wrapping paper tube
Hot glue
Woodgrain shelf liner (I added this over the tube off camera)
A small flashlight to pop in the end of the tube to make it glow.

For the “Bone” bow:
1 Spring hair clip
Silk leaves
Plaster bone (made with a bone shaped ice cube tray from the Dollar Tree and plaster of Paris)

This project was fun to make. Please refer to the step by step video tutorial to learn how to make your own costume. Now I can relax knowing I will not have to come up with a Halloween costume at the last minute…unless I change my mind LOL! Happy crafting!

PS if you liked this home-made costume tutorial please consider pinning it on Pinterest! Thanks!

Stamp Giveaway & Fabric Stamping Tutorial!

Hi friends! Today I am going to show you how to stamp on fabric! This technique is handy if you are looking to gussy up premade t-shirts, tote bags or baby onesies (how cute!) or if you want to make your own fabric for quilting and other crafts. Today we will use inexpensive cotton muslin fabric to make a scarf. This way you can try out these techniques without it costing you an arm and a leg:)

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Also the fine folks at Art Neko are giving away a set of the stamps I used, all you have to do is leave a comment and I will draw a name at random in one week! This contest is open to everyone world-wide. Thanks Art Neko!

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I want to mention that the dye I am using is Dr Ph Martin radiance watercolor. It is kinda pricey as far as dye goes but it also can be used as watercolor paint BUT it is not lightfast on paper, it is like using a marker as far as how quickly it would fade, but many paper crafters like this watercolor and use it. It is a wonderful, high quality dual purpose product.

Watch the video to learn how!

Sponsored by Art Neko  *Save 10% off your next order of any size or get free shipping on orders over $50 (whichever discount is greater you get!) just by mentioning thefrugalcrafter!

Supplies:

  • Lightweight cotton muslin fabric (white)
  • Mordant (I used Soda Ash aka washing soda)
  • Fabric Dyes (I am using Dr. Ph Martin Radiance which can be used as fabric dies or watercolors)
  • Stamps (ArtNeko)
  • Ink: Ranger Archival (if using another ink test it first on washed fabric)
  • Inktense pencils or blocks
  • Stiff brushes
  • Textile medium (optional)
  • Lumiere paint by Jaquard for accents (optional)

Directions:
1. Prewash fabric and trim to size, I used a 10″ wide strip as it comes off the bolt.
2. Mix a tablespoon of soda ash with 2 cups of very hot water. Soak fabric in this mix and ring out the excess.
3. Protect your table with plastic bags and spread out your fabric.
4. Apply dies. Pick colors near each other on the color wheel to avoid mud.
5. Let dry and press the fabric with a hot iron.
6. Hem the raw edges (I did not hem the short edges as they were the bound edges off the bolt of fabric)
7. Using firm pressure and a well inked stamp add images to the fabric. Heat set.
8. Color with inktense pencils or blocks.
9. Apply water to the images to liquefy the inktense and add more pigment from the block if desired.
10. Spatter more inktense if desired.
11. Accent with fabric paint, let dry and press again with a hot iron to set.

So, can you think of a project that this technique would be good on? Let me know in the comments and don’t forget, I will pick one lucky commenter to receive the stamps I used! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

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