DIY Acrylic Pouring Medium

Hi friends! I had a bunch of half full bottles cheap acrylic paint that I wanted to use up so I thought I’d give paint pouring a try.

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I didn’t want to invest in pricy pouring mediums and other fluids to make my paint flow so I made my own pouring medium using stuff I had around the house. Watch the video to see how!

Supplies (Affiliate links to Consumer Crafts (CC) and Amazon, Consumer Crafts has the best deals for today’s supplies)

  • White Glue CC, or Amazon
  • Cheap Acrylic Craft Paint: CC or Amazon 
  • Aerosol Hairspray
  • Gold Spray paint: CC or Amazon
  • A box or try to catch drips
  • A jar with lid for shaking up medium
  • Cans to rest your canvasses on
  • For your paint surface you can use stretched canvas, canvas panels or plywood

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Pouring medium recipe: Mix equal parts water and white glue in a jar and shake to mix.

Add the pouring medium to the paint. I like to add it to half empty bottles of paint but you can mix it in other cups if your bottles are full. You can dilute to craft paint with the medium up to 50% without affecting the binding of the paint to the canvas.

Directions:
1. Mix paint and medium at a 5o/50 ration and shake well.

2. Take color 1 and make a puddle, add other colors on that puddle and tip the canvas so the paint can cover and flow.

3. Spray on gold spray paint if desired. *You can drop alcohol on the gold spray paint to break it up if desired.

4. Spray surface with hairspray and tip the panel to keep movement going so it will form cells.

5. Let dry. Panels will dry overnight but stretched canvasses can take several days to dry.

Method #2 (Dirty Pour)

1. Add colors (with medium added) to a cup but do not mix.

2. Place canvas on cup and flip the whole thing over.

3. Lift off the cup and let the paint go!

4. Spray with hairspray (to make bubbles and cells) and gold spray paint if desired.

5. Let dry.

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Now, there are much more fancy ways to do acrylic paint pouring and I encourage you to check them out if you really love this project. I wanted to play and use up some stuff I already had but that’s not to say it’s not worth jumping in and trying the store bought supplies for this craft. Have fun and til next time happy crafting!

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How to Refill an Acrylic Paint Pen

Hi friends! I have really been enjoying my Posca fine tip paint pens and the other day I used up the white! I was about to reorder them but I decided that first I would try to refill them myself and it worked great! I also discovered that you can refill other brands as well. Learn how in today’s video!

I had a few viewers say that they were able to unscrew the bottom of the Posca pen if you unscrewed it in the opposite direction but mine would not budge. I think it might be the bullet tip versions that unscrew but since you know both ways to refill you will be fine no matter what kind of acrylic paint pen you have. 🙂

Supplies (Amazon affiliate links used)

Directions:

  1.  Mix acrylic paint with water until you have a paint the consistency of heavy cream. You could probably also use a fluid acrylic paint like Golden Flow paint without any additional water but I wanted to use the stuff I had.
  2. Open the pen. First try to unscrew the barrel from the top but if that doesn’t work you can pull out the nib with your fingers.
  3. Use a pipette to fill the pen either though the nib opening (like Posca) or directly in the barrel (like Ohuhu.)
  4. Replace the nib (or screw the pen back together, cap it and shake to make sure the paint is well mixed and test it. You may need to depress the nib (pump the pen) to start the ink flowing especially if your pen has been dry for a while.

Tip, don’t let the pen dry out, refill it as soon as you use it up to prevent paint drying in the nib and clogging. Pat yourself on the back because you just kept some junk out of the landfill and more cash in your pocket. Happy crafting!

DIY Inktense Palette & My First Facebook Live with Demo and Q&A

Hi friends! I tried out Facebook live yesterday and did a live demo of a watering can with flowers in a loose style. I painted it with Inktense blocks but you can use watercolors.

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I know not everyone is on Facebook (especially These days!) but it is much easier for me to see your questions during a live stream so I might pop in once a month and do a live Q&A kinda like the old “Ask a Crafter” videos I used to do so if you are interested in that be sure to like and follow by Frugal Crafter Community Facebook page. To make sure you don’t miss a live event click like, then follow and click see first. I plan on posting the replay on my blog here but if you want to interact live you will need to follow on Facebook.

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Here is the video from yesterday:

Here is a video showing how I made the palette:

I had a full set of inktense blocks and pencils as well as a small set of 12 that a sweet viewer had sent me years ago when I was unsure if I wanted to get the full set. I like them enough to buy the set of 72 but having doubles I felt silly investing in another duplicate product just because it was a different format. Plus I couldn’t even find the Inktense pan set to purchase. Honestly I use the pencils more than the blocks anyway so I figured I could sacrifice some of the blocks to go in the palette and as an extra bonus all of my loose blocks fit in my large Inkense block tin so less storage space!

So you are probably wondering how these differ from watercolors? Well, to be honest I prefer watercolors. I find Inktense to be vibrant but yet it’s chalky and I find this chalky quality more in the block than in the pencil although they are purportedly the same thing. The big attribute to inktense is that after you paint with it on paper (and it dries completely) it bonds permanently with the paper so you can layer over it without if reactivating. That’s a boon to mixed media artists who want to keep working on a project without disturbing the layers underneath. You can use watercolor over inktense as it won’t repel the media because it dries matte. My top recommendation for the inktense line will always be the pencils but knowing how you like to use media can help you choose the right thing for you. I hope you enjoyed this craft hack and live rebroadcast. If you would like to catch my next live endeavor I will be doing a guest live stream on the LAVA soap facebook page at 2pm ET today where I will show you how to make your own Acrylic pouring medium and we will do an acrylic pour. The stream will last about 15 minutes. I’m a bit nervous so wish me luck! Have a great day and til next time happy crafting!

DIY Rust! {Get that Groovy Grungy Look at Home!}

Hi friends! Today I am going to show you how to use basic supplies you probably already have to get an old rusty patina look for your home decor and papercraft projects!

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You can buy specifically made rust kits to create these effects but in today’s tutorial I’ll show you how easy it is to get the look with common supplies. Watch the video to see how!

Sponsored by LAVA Soap! Visit their website for money saving coupons and to find a store near you!

Supplies:

*Here is my faux pewter tutorial that I mentioned in the video!

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Directions for rust paste:
1. Mix grit in to dark brown (burnt umber) and reddish-brown (burnt sienna) separately. You want a loose mud consistency.

2. Apply dark brown to your substrate (use embossed thin cardboard with layers of die cut cardboard for a nice texture) with a stiff brush working it into the nooks and crannies. You can stipple on the paint for extra texture. Let dry.

3. Dry brush copper or gold over the panel.

4. Use a palette knife to apply the reddish-brown. You can stipple on some of the red-brown color too.

5. Mix turquoise and white to make a pale aqua. Add water and apply to panel then spray with water so it will drip and look like patina.

I hope you try this technique with the supplies you have on hand and let me know how it goes! If you enjoyed this tutorial I’d love it if you shared it with your crafty friends using one of the handing sharing buttons below! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

DIY Perfect Gouache Palette From Harbor Freight Bargain!

Hi friends! See how I used this cheap container from Harbor Freight to make the perfect palette for my gouache paint.

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As you probably know gouache paint can be rewet like watercolor after it has dried so you can paint waste free. The problem with letting big gobs of it dry in a watercolor palette is that the dry paint can shrink and crack and then fall out of the palette or get mixed up with all the other colors. What a bummer! I love the convenience of having all of my paint accessible because I am more likely to use it. Watch the video to see my cheap and easy solution!

Supplies:

  • I found a clear plastic case at harbor freight that had 24 clear flip top boxes in it for $4.79 This is available on Amazon too but it is more expensive. This would also work if you want a smaller set up that holds 28 colors and it is cheap!
  • Here is the Arteza Gouache set I used. Make sure to peel off the color labels before you squeeze out the paint of they wont come off!
  • Tube wringer (optional) I have this one but I wish I had a metal one and this one is cheaper too! *I use a lot of small watercolor tubes and the paint is expensive so I find the tube wringer to be a good investment (A few drops of watercolor can create many paintings) but if your paint is not that precious it might not be worth it. I like to save money and trips to the store:)

Directions:
1. Remove color label from tube and stick it to the side of the little box. *Or you can make a label with the color name and pigment info/light-fast rating.

2. Fill with paint.

3. Put small containers back in big box for storage. As the containers are not air tight I think you are fine to close them unless you have just used them and introduced any water to the pants, in that case I’d let them dry out a bit before closing. Since I filled them with fresh paint and I know there are no contaminants I closed them.

I think there are many things these little boxes would be useful for and you might even have something in your stash that will work the same way as this. Have fun organizing your palette and til next time happy crafting!

 

DIY Bath Bomb Recipe and Tutorial!

Hi friends!  My girls and I had such fun making these for gifts this year. It is a fun craft to make with the kids and you can even teach them about chemical reactions so it’s art and science all in one project!

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Watch the video to see how! I’ll post the recipe below:)

Supplies & Recipe (with affiliate links to amazon BUT please note that everything EXCEPT citric acid and fragrance will be cheaper from your local grocery store, I want my peeps to get good deals!)

*Dry ingredients-whisk together in a bowl.
1 cup Baking Soda
1/2 cup Citric Acid
1/2 cup Epsom Salts
1/2 cup Corn Starch

*Wet ingredients Put in a small jar and shake
1 Tablespoon water
1 Tablespoon mineral oil (you can use melted coconut oil, soybean or olive oil but I chose mineral/baby oil as it will not turn rancid which is not an issue if you are using the bath bombs soon)
1 teaspoon of fragrance oil (I used one tsp or 3 droppers full but other recipes called for 6 which seemed like a lot. Use your own tastes and judgement)
Liquid food coloring as desired)
Bath bomb moulds 

Directions:
1. Whisk dry ingredients together. Slowly add the freshly shaken wet ingredients to the dry and combine with a whisk until there are no big lumps and it looks like sand.

2. Overfill both halves of your mold and press together firmly. You can use other moulds you have as well but you need to pack the mixture in very tightly or the bath bomb might crumble when you remove it from the mold.

3. Remove the bath bomb from the mold and set in a tray/box lined with plastic wrap to dry for 48 hours.

4. After 48 hours wrap with plastic wrap and blast with a hairdryer for a professional look. You can also add in dry pressed flowers when you warp them for a beautiful presentation.

Want a side of science with your art?

Why does it fizz? The citric acid is an acid and it reacts with baking soda (a base) just like vinegar and baking soda does. The bombs are quiet until water activates the citric acid and the reaction begins. The bubbles that are created are carbon dioxide. The corn starch serves two purposes: 1. it acts as a filler and a buffering agent between the citric acid and baking soda so you get a “slow fizz” rather than an explosion and 2. it is a binder and helps the bath bomb hold it’s rock hard shape until dunked in water.

The remaining ingredients are therapeutic!
Epsom salts will soothe sore muscles and soften skin
The oils smell nice and will moisturizer skin and the food color is pretty.

I had a lot of requests to post this tutorial after sharing photos of the bath bombs we were making. I hope you have as much fun making this as we did! Happy crafting!

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Chalk Talk! Top Tips for Using Your Chalks in Cardmaking & Papercrafts

Hi friends! There are so many cool supplies coming out every day that we can easily be distracted from the gems we already have in our stash. Today I am going to share my top tips and techniques for using chalk. When I say “chalks” I am talking about soft chalky pastels, decorator chalks or even eyeshadow. I bet you have something in your house that will work for these techniques!

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I will share techniques using inexpensive supplies from pencils, to pastels to eyeshadow and the neat thing is that for many techniques you can use any of them. I hope this helps you get more use out of what you have or choose the right product if you are looking to add chalk to your stash.  Please note that colored chalkboard chalk is not pigmented enough for good results.

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I love the “photo tinting” feeling I get using chalk to color these vintage stamped images from our sponsor Top Flight Stamps (Use coupon code thefrugalcrafter10 to save 10% on your order, also USA orders over $50 ship free!) Speaking of photo tinting you can print out photos in grayscale and use the dry techniques to tint them with chalks. It was one of my favorite Scrapbook techniques…I really need to do that again!

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So, Are you ready to rock your chalk? Watch the video and get started!

Stamps from our sponsor Top Flight Stamps: Rememer save 10% with coupon code thefrugalcrafter10 at top Flight Stamps and USA orders over $50 ship free!

Pastel/Chalk Supplies:

Blenders *Note: Cosmetic sponges and pointed cotton swabs are way cheaper at Dollar Tree

Other:

In praise of vegetable glycerin! As you know from this very silly video I love to make my own supplies using glycerin. I use it to re-ink my embossing ink pads and to make homemade pigment ink. I also use it with water to rejuice my waterbased blending pens. It is useful in cake decorating and candy making as well as DIY beauty products. Also a little goes a long way and it is so useful! I had a viewer on YouTube ask if they could use a waterbrush instead of a waterbased blending pen for the brush technique. You can, however I recommend working on watercolor paper if you do as a waterbrush is going to give you more of a watercolor look at the extra water will pill ordinary cardstock. It is the glycerin in the blender marker that lubricates the tip of the marker and lets the media glide across the cardstock and that is why I recommend that method. If you don’t want to get a waterbased blending marker simply dip a pointed q-tip in the water/glycerin mix and use that, it will work the same. 😀

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I hope you enjoyed this video. I worked really hard on it and I’d like to make more overlooked supply focus videos in the future so if you have any ideas on what supply to feature next let me know in the comments below. If you like this video I’d love it if you shared it on social media using one of the handy sharing links below. Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

PS Want more chalk ideas? Here is a DIY chalk ink made from chalk pastels and how to ink up your stamps with chalk pastels. Man, are chalks useful or what?

 

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