The Lazy Stampers Guide to Layering Stamps

Hi friends, are you curious about (or frustrated by) layering stamps? Today I will take out some of the mysteries and help you decide what kind is best for you or if they are for you at all.

I will try and find links to the products I used or similar ones if they are retired. I keep and use my stamps for a long time so often they are unavailable when you are watching my video. There are new beautiful stamps being released every day so feel free to follow along with what you like! Affiliate links will be used if available.

Type of layering stamps:

Rubber-These were the first layer stamps I ever used. Stampin’ up made these on wood blocks and they were called “2-Step Stampin’.” To get perfect alignment you could use a stamp-a-majig (best $12 you can spend if you want perfect placement for ANY stamp. wood block or clear) but the best thing about these designs was that you didn’t need to stamp them perfectly for a beautiful result. My favorite stamps of this genre come from Rubbernecker. You can still get some of the old-style rubber stamp (the layered poppy I demonstrated is still available) but they have transitioned over to clear photopolymer for easier alignment (and to work with the new style hinged stamp positioners like this) and so they can be used with metal dies. Rubber stamps can use any ink or water-based markers to get excellent results. The downside to the rubber layering stamps is that they are harder to find and you don’t get photorealistic designs from them. They are the most durable kind of stamp and give the best impression in my opinion. They also tend to be on the expensive side.

Photopolymer: These stamps are clear, and easily stain, but give an excellent impression. You can use dye ink, pigment ink and water-based markers on them as you can with rubber stamps however you want to avoid harsh chemicals and inks such as solvents. Since they are clear they are easier to line up well and can be used in a hinged stamp platform to make lining up and making multiple of designs easy. Altenew has a great selection of photopolymer layering stamps including the Amaryllis stamp I used. These stamps are made by a process of exposing a gel to UV light and can also turn yellow or even be damaged is stored near a window so I recommend storing them away from light for longevity. The macaron stamp set I used is from Impression Obsession but it seems to be discontinued however some other sweets stamps from the same designer are 50% off right now! I did find a similar macaron stamp from Crafters Companion. Photopolymer stamps give a great impression but are a bit expensive and you need to take care of storing them and be mindful of what ink you use. Also never stamp them on ink jet photo paper as it may fuse to the stamp and ruin it.

Silicone stamps: These clear stamps are my least favorite but the cost is much lower than the other two options. You usually only see the silicone stamps in big box stores from large manufacturers because they need to order large amounts to make it worthwhile. silicone stamps are made, usually in China, by pouring silicone into a mold. They often do not stick as well to clear blocks (but sometimes come fused to the packaging!) and dye inks tend to bead up on them is there is a large solid area. Markers do not work well on this kind of stamp because marker ink is too thin. Pigment ink works best on silicone stamps. I like Versafine Clair but that can be pricey so you might want to choose a multi pack of mini cubes to get more variety at a smaller cost and less need for storage space. If you have trouble with ink sticking you can rub the stamp with an eraser prior to stamping.

I hope you found this helpful and it inspires you you pull out your layering stamps and make a card! Happy crafting!

Tell me what YOU think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.