Stamp Giveaway & Fabric Stamping Tutorial!

Hi friends! Today I am going to show you how to stamp on fabric! This technique is handy if you are looking to gussy up premade t-shirts, tote bags or baby onesies (how cute!) or if you want to make your own fabric for quilting and other crafts. Today we will use inexpensive cotton muslin fabric to make a scarf. This way you can try out these techniques without it costing you an arm and a leg:)

scarfclassy

Also the fine folks at Art Neko are giving away a set of the stamps I used, all you have to do is leave a comment and I will draw a name at random in one week! This contest is open to everyone world-wide. Thanks Art Neko!

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I want to mention that the dye I am using is Dr Ph Martin radiance watercolor. It is kinda pricey as far as dye goes but it also can be used as watercolor paint BUT it is not lightfast on paper, it is like using a marker as far as how quickly it would fade, but many paper crafters like this watercolor and use it. It is a wonderful, high quality dual purpose product.

Watch the video to learn how!

Sponsored by Art Neko  *Save 10% off your next order of any size or get free shipping on orders over $50 (whichever discount is greater you get!) just by mentioning thefrugalcrafter!

Supplies:

  • Lightweight cotton muslin fabric (white)
  • Mordant (I used Soda Ash aka washing soda)
  • Fabric Dyes (I am using Dr. Ph Martin Radiance which can be used as fabric dies or watercolors)
  • Stamps (ArtNeko)
  • Ink: Ranger Archival (if using another ink test it first on washed fabric)
  • Inktense pencils or blocks
  • Stiff brushes
  • Textile medium (optional)
  • Lumiere paint by Jaquard for accents (optional)

Directions:
1. Prewash fabric and trim to size, I used a 10″ wide strip as it comes off the bolt.
2. Mix a tablespoon of soda ash with 2 cups of very hot water. Soak fabric in this mix and ring out the excess.
3. Protect your table with plastic bags and spread out your fabric.
4. Apply dies. Pick colors near each other on the color wheel to avoid mud.
5. Let dry and press the fabric with a hot iron.
6. Hem the raw edges (I did not hem the short edges as they were the bound edges off the bolt of fabric)
7. Using firm pressure and a well inked stamp add images to the fabric. Heat set.
8. Color with inktense pencils or blocks.
9. Apply water to the images to liquefy the inktense and add more pigment from the block if desired.
10. Spatter more inktense if desired.
11. Accent with fabric paint, let dry and press again with a hot iron to set.

So, can you think of a project that this technique would be good on? Let me know in the comments and don’t forget, I will pick one lucky commenter to receive the stamps I used! Thanks for stopping by and til next time happy crafting!

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